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8305 Crestridge Road | RLAH
 

8305 Crestridge Road

Fairfax Station | VA

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Luxurious Living in Washington, DC’s Fairfax County Suburbs! Opulence without pretentiousness defines this custom home in Fairfax Station, VA. It took the Owners nearly a year to build a home that stands out amongst others in the market. No expense was spared in selecting the tiniest architectural and design touches. Here is your chance to benefit greatly from their diligence. This home is designed to complement the lifestyle you crave – a quiet respite close to everything Washington DC has to offer. At the intersection of privacy, location and comfortable luxury living, it’s entirely possible that you will hardly ever need to leave the suburban oasis. All the luxury creature comforts you need for a good life are right here, an expanded home office suite, an exercise studio, home theater, a doggy wash and so much more. Friends and family will gather on your custom deck. The exterior is cleverly designed with three distinct outdoor “rooms”, including a beautiful screened porch. The owner created a stand-alone wood burning boiler that supplies heat to the main residence. This drastically reduces the amount of energy they use from the grid, in turn reducing the home’s negative environmental impact. Delaware field stone surrounds the house on all four sides, hunting and privacy on 5 acres, plus the county park beyond, the property borders Fountain Head Regional Park.

Established 168 years ago in 1851, Fairfax Station was originally a station of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, with proximity to the county seat of Fairfax; it was known as “Lee’s Station” during its first year. During the Civil War in August 1862, Clara Barton tended to wounded Union and Confederate troops at the station after the Second Battle of Bull Run (Manassas), with headquarters at nearby St. Mary’s Church. An employee of the U.S. Patent Office in Washington at the start of the war, Barton later founded the American Red Cross in 1881. A small skirmish was also fought during at Brimstone Hill near Fairfax Station, the last in the county during the war. The construction of St. Mary’s began in 1858, and it was the first Catholic church in Fairfax County. Its parishioners were primarily Irish immigrants, employed by the railroad. The area was renamed Swetnam in 1897, and reverted to Fairfax Station in 1921. Ekoji Buddhist Temple is also located in Fairfax Station, built 21 years ago in 1998

 

Fairfax Station is an affluent community in Northern Virginia; its center is located 22 miles southwest of Washington, D.C. Fairfax Station is located in western Fairfax County, between Clifton to the west, Burke to the east, and the city of Fairfax to the north. The original community of Fairfax Station is located in the eastern part, where State Route 123 (Ox Road) crosses the Norfolk Southern Railway line. State Route 286, the Fairfax County Parkway, curves through the center of the CDP, leading northwest to Fair Lakes and southeast to Newington. The average lifestyle for residents of Fairfax Station rates above those of the national index in categories including total household expenditure, insurance, clothing, education, entertainment, food, health care, personal care, tobacco, transportation, utilities, and gifts. The factors that are below average when compared to the national (lowest in the state for many of them): crime rate, personal crime risk, murder risk, rape risk, larceny risk, and automotive theft risk.

 

The education system in Fairfax County is among the top public school counties in the country. The children of Fairfax Station go to six elementary schools; William Halley Elementary for the southern part of Fairfax Station and Silverbrook Elementary for the northern part. They can also attend Fairview Elementary, Oak View Elementary, Bonnie Brae Elementary or Sangster Elementary. After 6th grade, the last year in all of the elementary schools, students enter one of four public schools: South County Middle School (feeder school for South County High School), Robinson Secondary School, Robert Frost Middle School (feeder for W.T. Woodson High School), or Lake Braddock Secondary School.

 

[Source: Wikipedia]

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Offered At | $2,000,000

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